Photo: AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File

Jacob Chansley — known as the “QAnon Shaman” — sentenced to prison

November 17, 2021

~ 4 minutes read

On Wednesday, Jacob Chansley, also referred to as the QAnon Shaman, was sentenced to 41 months in prison for his involvement in the events at the US Capitol on January 6th, 2021.
What else is each side focusing on?
  • Chansley’s actions on January 6th amount to a criminal offense. 
  • Chansley’s sentence is about both his actions and deterring people from overthrowing our system of government. 
  • Chansley did not receive the maximum sentence. 
  • Chansley committed no violent crime.
  • Chansley has been held in solitary confinement since his arrest.
  • The judge has denied Chansley’s release on multiple occasions prior to his trial. 
The Narrative

Chansley deserves this sentence for trying to overthrow the government on January 6th. 

This is not enough of a punishment, but a good start. The length of this sentence has the potential to deter people from participating in insurrectionist activities in the future. 

Chansley is a political prisoner who is being unfairly treated to set an example. He is a non-violent offender that is being treated as dangerous. 

It’s hypocritical of the left to cheer on this injustice while supposedly advocating for criminal justice reform elsewhere. 

How could a reasonable person come to think that?
  • The insurrection on January 6th amounts to treason — it was an attempt to overthrow the government.
  • By prosecuting the people involved, the courts show that insurrectionists will be held accountable.
  • The demonstrators on January 6th were raising legitimate concerns, and were largely non-violent. 
  • The prosecution of January 6th protestors is politically motivated, with the intention of spreading fear among conservatives.

What else is the left focusing on?

  • Chansley’s actions on January 6th amount to a criminal offense. 
  • Chansley’s sentence is about both his actions and deterring people from overthrowing our system of government. 
  • Chansley did not receive the maximum sentence. 

The Narrative:

Chansley deserves this sentence for trying to overthrow the government on January 6th. 

This is not enough of a punishment, but a good start. The length of this sentence has the potential to deter people from participating in insurrectionist activities in the future.

How could a reasonable person come to think that?

  • The insurrection on January 6th amounts to treason — it was an attempt to overthrow the government.
  • By prosecuting the people involved, the courts show that insurrectionists will be held accountable.

 

What else is the right focusing on?

  • Chansley committed no violent crime.
  • Chansley has been held in solitary confinement since his arrest.
  • The judge has denied Chansley’s release on multiple occasions prior to his trial. 

The Narrative:

Chansley is a political prisoner who is being unfairly treated to set an example. He is a non-violent offender that is being treated as dangerous. 

It’s hypocritical of the left to cheer on this injustice while supposedly advocating for criminal justice reform elsewhere. 

How could a reasonable person come to think that?

  • The demonstrators on January 6th were raising legitimate concerns, and were largely non-violent. 
  • The prosecution of January 6th protestors is politically motivated, with the intention of spreading fear among conservatives.

Our view of what happened at the US Capitol on January 6th and the arrests and trials that followed will influence our view of Chansley’s sentencing. 

We must therefore first try to understand our contra partisans’ view on January 6th before we’ll be able to constructively discuss the outcome of Chansley’s trial. Their ideas sound like nonsense within our understanding of that day, but might be reasonable within their perspective.

 

Still confused about how the other side is seeing this? Check out our previous analyses on January 6th and the 2020 election. If you found this useful, share it with your friends and family, and follow us on TwitterInstagram, and Facebook for more.